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Wednesday, July 3, 2019

WHY DO DOG's SCRATCH BED AND CARPET BEFORE LYING DOWN?

It is also called as “DENNING”, if your dog’s digging in her bed is due to natural instinct, rather than misbehaving. When these DOG’s were living in the wild, the instinct of these DOG was to hide in areas that make them comfortable and protected when they are going to sleep.


They may dig a hole to create a space and can hide from any predators as well as keep warm and dry in the winter and cool in the summers.





When a dog started to live indoors, this instinct continuous to be present and can lead to their DIGGING into their blankets or bed’s in order to create their protected space. This instinct for your DOG to dig into bed’s may be connected to the body temperature as the desire to “mark” the bed as hers and to hide herself, create a nest for her puppies’ comfort.





This instinct for your dog to dig into her bedding may be connected to:
1. Body temperature

  • Scratching could be an attempt to achieve a more appealing temperature zone, either warmer during winter or cooler during Summer’s.


  • DOG’s often dig such holes outdoors, also may repeat this behaviour vestigial indoors.

2. The desire to “mark” the bed as hers & Marking Territory

  • The foot pads of your DOG have glands in them which emits an odour of your DOG. When your DOG digs or scratches the area where he is going to sleep, it is to mark the area with the scent.

  • DOG’s (and many other animals) have a natural desire to spread their scent around their area.


  • This is their only way of letting other animals to clear that this is their territory belongs to me and the same is true when they give their beds a couple casual scratches.


  • Scent glands can be found, among other places also like Dogs scratching at trees and soil are often for the same reason, to display their area and territory


  • DOG’s are territorial creatures in which they mark areas to claim the spaces as theirs. This is usually done by urinating on an object. Both male and female dogs mark territory. Dogs have other ways of marking besides urination which is done by scratching at the bed.


  • Dogs have sweat glands in their paws, which leave a scent on bedding when they scratch at it. Dogs are more likely to take to a bedding spot if it is in an area, they already consider theirs.

3. Nervous Behaviour & Anxiety

  • If you have noticed your dog’s scratching and digging becoming excessive? and it might point to a sign of nervous behaviour in your dog. Ask yourself have been any major changes occurred in your DOG’s life or routine – or possibly any of yours?


  • Compulsive digging or scratching on the floor or on the furniture with no relaxation afterwards to which follow could be an indication that something more troubling is going on within your dog. Some DOG’s dig as part of a displacement behaviour if they are ANXIOUS or EXCITED.


  • This type of pawing/digging/scratching would not be associated with your DOG curling up in the area it was scratching. These DOG’s should be treated for their anxiety or over-arousal treatment with the help of VET.

4. To hide herself & hide Treasure


  • Your dog’s instinct may be forcing to dig a den in which she can hide in. If she was living in the wild, her effort to dig this spot would create a place that is more comfortable for her to rest in while she can be hidden from other animals of the wild.






  • While this is not necessary that a dog living in a home has the instinct still present in them and can lead to this behaviour.


  • If your dog is digging at the bed may be trying to hide something especially sweet thing for his friend DOG or this could be a favourite toy or a treat they’re just saving for later. Also watch your dog where their favourite hiding spots are.

5. To create a nest for her puppies

  • When female dogs are pregnant, they may dig to make a small nest for their puppies and may be a sign that she is about ready to have her puppies in the WORLD. In this case this behaviour is not vestigial, but is due to hormone-driven.


6. Outdoor Conditions


  • If your dog sleeps outside and has no bed access, he might dig up and even scratch in his sleeping area to make an attempt to get warmer or cooler place to sleep, depending on the weather outside.


  • Even if you do provide a bed outside, some dogs might prefer to dig their own holes in which to sleep.


7. Comfort
  • Just like we fluff our pillows and arrange our bedding to our liking, your dog may do the same thing. An arthritic dog in particular may circle and dig at the bed in an attempt to make the pain lessen.


  • DOG’s scratch and dig at their bed, pillows etc and generate chill-out spots which can regulate their temperature.





8. Roundabout or to Investigate
  • The most common behaviour of accompanying the common bed-digging is the roundabout.

  • You’ve might have seen it before that your DOG gives the bedding a scratch or two before turning around a couple of times before it lies down and lastly then, only they’re completely satisfied with their spot, they’ll choose to lie down in comfort.

  • Again, the obvious reason is comfort which they’re also doing this for safety reasons. They’re checking out the territory marks and make sure that it’s safe to lie down before they do.



SOLUTION: -



  • If the problem get’s worse follow the below test cases








  • You should buy a nest, DOG couch for it to sleep

  • If the problem of scratching turns into disaster then probably TRIM THE NAIL’s with only using DOG NAIL TRIMMER.




  • Distract your PET DOG while you caught him in the act and throw a Ball towards or give a DOG FOOD.








  • If your DOG sleep’s outside the House and wants to sleep inside then he might find your sleeping place and give you a hint that he might also want to sleep inside the house or on the bed.




  • If things don’t change contact a VET immediately.








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